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All change with your bins - New recycling rules across Norfolk start today

09:56 01 October 2014

Blue recycling bins from Norwich City Council. Picture: James Bass.

Blue recycling bins from Norwich City Council. Picture: James Bass.

Archant Norfolk Photographic © 2009

Householders will no longer need to drive to a bottle-bank or spend time separating rubbish to recycle as more items can soon be deposited at the kerbside.

What can be recycled:

• Paper

• Cardboard

• Shredded paper

• Clean foil and foil containers

• Envelopes

• Plastic bottles – including fizzy drinks, milk and detergent bottles (lids too if left on)

• Clean food pots, tubs and trays – including yoghurt pots, ice cream and margarine tubs, microwave food trays

• Waxed food and drink cartons, such as soup and juice packs

• Glass bottles and jars (if lids are left on)

From Wednesday Norfolk-wide changes will mean that materials including glass bottles, jars, plastic food pots, tubs and trays, juice and soup cartons can be put in one recycling bin at home.

All the district councils in Norfolk have come together under the Norfolk Waste Partnership to bring about their so-called ‘recycling revolution’.

Collection days and dates will not be affected by the introduction of this new service and recycling bin colours will not change.

Across the county, new materials will be recycled along with the existing ones such as card, paper, steel and aluminium cans and plastic bottles.

What cannot be recycled:

• General household waste

• Garden waste

• Kitchen food waste

• Bagged waste

• Plastic bags – these can be reused or most supermarkets now offer carrier bag recycling

• Lids, corks and stoppers from glass jars and bottles

• Light bulbs

• Window panes

• Mirrors

In Norwich people will not need to use their green box for glass anymore because it can go in with everything else in the blue recycling bin.

Now the green box will become redundant.

For people living in a flat or a property with communal bins in the city, they will be able to recycle all the new materials but the changes will work slightly differently.

In the communal compound there will be a large blue recycling bin which can take most of the new materials as well as the old ones – except for glass bottles and jars, which will still need to be separated into the communal green bin there.

And people who do not have a wheelie bin will have a recycling sack or a green box. But again glass jars and bottles must continue to go in the green box.

County-wide people are being reminded to rinse the items they put in their recycling bin to keep the bins clean.

In addition to household recycling collections, people can recycle a very wide range of materials at Norfolk’s network of 20 recycling centres.

The changes in the recycling have been made possible because of the upgrade and extension of the materials and recycling facility at Costessey which is run by NEWS, a publicly-owned joint venture company.

John Fisher, chairman of the Norfolk Waste Partnership, which is made up of all seven district authorities in Norfolk plus Norfolk County Council encouraged people to get recycling.

“We have now got a system that’s equal to anyone else’s in the country. Now it’s a matter of trying to get everybody on board and recycling as much as they can.”

More information is available at www.recyclefornorfolk.org.uk

49 comments

  • Sorry to burst people’s bubble but it appears the NWP are not being honest with the people of Norfolk over this so-called recycling revolution. I imagine the majority of us expect “recycling plastic” to be going through a process to turn it back into a form of plastic, but after all the years getting this off the ground, word has it that the NWP have not managed to arrange for this to happen, so NEWS at Costessey (an NCC owned company), after sorting through the rubbish, will be sending it off as RDF to be burnt. If that is true does it really matter what we put in the recycling bin?

    Report this comment

    Honest John

    Thursday, October 2, 2014

  • My god! what is so hard to understand? if in doubt about lids, then put them in the black bin for gods sake. No wonder the phrase 'The idiot public' The amount of times I have seen a plastic bag sticking out of a green bin just makes me feel sad for the numpties who do not understand the simplest of instructions...

    Report this comment

    Gorlestonboy7

    Thursday, October 2, 2014

  • Sugarbeet - I have seen a copy of the full specification

    Report this comment

    Econic

    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

  • I used to recycle everything but after the refuse collectors didnt pick up the rubbish three weeks on the trot and the council tried to fob me off with a reason for their failure to collect I now place everything into one bin. Do I care? No, not a jot.

    Report this comment

    wes1975

    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

  • By the way I see Murphy is back home, bless him, with the EDP trying to paint him as a hero. I expect Di.ckens, Del Boy & Co will soon be throwing tonnes of missinformation and abuse our way. Hey Hoo my new standard answer to them will be - On Your Bike D -!

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

  • LID UPDATE Cllr John Fisher, of NCC, was asked the lids on or off question on radio norfolk just after 10 this morning. He explained how the machinery will pick up and seperate out the lids and it doesnt matter if attached or not attached. Ingo I will forward you the info on John Innes waste conference in a bit the closing day to let them know you want to attend is tomorrow.

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

  • Will try and make it, Canary boy, can I just walk in or do I have to register for what I, no doubt, pay a hefty fee to John Innes for? We are getting bamboozled with new machinery and the mechanics, the start of every recycling process, but we have precious little plans for landfill mining and remediation. If we increase the scope of profits with OUR resources, doing all the work and the cleaning for NORSE, does this mean our annual bills will be reduced?

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

  • Econic, are you commenting as a council officer or employee of the recycling company or just giving your interpretation of the ambiguity?

    Report this comment

    Sugarbeet

    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

  • I asked NCC about glass bottlejar lid question. They said it wasn't there problem and to ask the districtborough council, demonstrating again that they are a pointless, useless expense to us all.

    Report this comment

    Sugarbeet

    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

  • colinlocal - the answer is YES if they are metal or plastic screw on lids - put them in the recycling bin

    Report this comment

    Econic

    Tuesday, September 30, 2014

  • Can someone clarify the lid question. Are lids recyclable or not ?? It's either one or the other! Let's get some sensible clarification on this issue instead of confusion !!

    Report this comment

    colinlocal

    Tuesday, September 30, 2014

  • Has the lid arguement been put to bed yet?

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Tuesday, September 30, 2014

  • Ingo will I see you Thursday 9th Oct at the John Inness Centre where NCC are holding a conference on the way forward for Norfolks waste? Perhaps Daisy will come along and blind us with her knowledge of incineration or landfill as the only option for dealing with our waste while showing her ignorance of any other processes which comply with the EUs aim of reuse, repair, recycle working rapidly towards zero waste.

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Tuesday, September 30, 2014

  • Eyewash! What are the products we can buy, made from our recycled resources? Which company's can we elevate for their use of recycled materials making new innovative products? What are Norfolks plans to decrease landfill dumping, resources which could be turned into energy compost and valuable materials? When will this programm be ready to restore the first landfill site back to woodland? Have you ever looked at enhanced landfill mining and gasplasma energy recovery at County Hall, yawn....? This initiative asks us to prepare the right mix for incineration in Suffolk and I would suggest to councils, go find private recyclers who benefit the community for their resources, not some wastefull inept council.

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Tuesday, September 30, 2014

  • The article is a little confusing about lids. I think they mean that some glass and plastic bottles have lids that are almost impossible to prise off - so better to put the whole thing in (and let the processing plant deal with it) than put in landfill. Where lids unscrewpop off easily, they should go in general waste bins. That makes more sense...I think.

    Report this comment

    Anglianjacky

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • I bet councillors who promoted stone-age incineration technology in Norfolk will be foaming from their mouths reading this article. Recycling plastics and Glass is an EU directive that came into force last year and been on the cards since 2009. The next action from the EU is to work to achieve zero waste even if it means taxing petro chemicals companies that produce plastic and rewarding recycling companies. I expect incinerators will be a thing of the past when council waste contracts come up for renewal in 25-30 years time. I can see many will not be maintained closer to the decommissioning dates.

    Report this comment

    LynBin

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • The caption boxes are not helpful, so lets clear this up. The contractor has to recycle 99% of good materials which you put in the recycling bin, with this material being recycled in the UK or western Europe. The contractor will recycle lids off of plastic bottles. The metal lids on jam jars will be recycled but corks, real or man made wont be recycled. The contract is broad enough to make sure that most genuine mistakes are catered for. The thing to do is get on with it as long as the items are put loose and not in bags they'll be OK. Generally in modern sorting plants they take the glass out first mechanically by using a glass screen which breaks the glass bottles and jars. The end processor will sort out any bits of metal, aluminium neck rings etc as they have value. Hope this helps

    Report this comment

    Econic

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Bottlejar lids and tops can be accepted both attached or separated. Previously it was just the containers and no lids.

    Report this comment

    Jimmy Eh

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • About bloomin time too! As to the jarbottle lid conundrum, I think mike smith has it right. Hopefully the district councils will pull their fingers out and produce clarification leaflets ASAP.

    Report this comment

    Cyril the Canary

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Its not complicated at all. Once into the swing of thinking about what you put in which bin you soon do it automatically. Virtually all that goes into the black bin now is dirty plastic film and dirty foil, hoover contents and empty pet food pouches. As for lids NCC could help by defining the criterion but as I understand it wash out the item replace the lid and put it in the bin. Cant understand why loose lids would be a problem but there you go nothing is ever clearly communicated if NCC are in control!

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Its all just far too complicated it should all be put in the black bin for the council to sort out. just like we did when we lived in Germany.

    Report this comment

    Johnny Norfolk

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • we only have 2 bins, if we want to recycle other items we have to drive to recycling centre which in my eyes is against the ethos of green recycling. if we had more bins we would recycle more.

    Report this comment

    calmudownboy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Re the query about lids on or off. I would interpret it as follows — Jar or bottle with lid or stopper attached can be recycled. Jar or bottle without a lid or stopper can be recycled. Loose lids and stoppers not attached to a jar or bottle cannot be recycled so are rubbish bin material.

    Report this comment

    mike smith

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • We have had all the easy wins on recycling now according to the C.E.O. of WRAP.So no more until we adhere to the Waste Hierarchy of REDUCE, RE-USE, REPAIR,RECYCLE,BURY OR BURN for all types of waste.

    Report this comment

    bedoomed

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • I've decided that I'm not going to put my lids into the recycling, for fear of upsetting someone at the council. Regards, Whiley.

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • By the way calmudownboy in West Norfolk we have a large grey food bin, a small grey kitchen indoor food waste caddy, a Green bin (Recyclables), a Brown Bin (Garden waste) and a Black bin (general waste). We take pride in sorting our waste which, contrary to its title, is mostly a valuable commidity. We are lucky that our borough council are behind recycling whereas Castle, Iles, Plant & the other dinosaurs on your council, are all incinerator fans unwilling to guide residents towards meaningful recycling. Lucky UKIP are taking over is it not?

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • £250,000 for Master Composting and similar initiatives.Not sure if this includes recycling credits Daisy.

    Report this comment

    bedoomed

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Perhaps the EDP would be kind enough to publish the current recycling rates by council district for us so we can all see what districts have responsible residents and which have those who don't give a t.ss.

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Calmudownboy!! I dont consider a paltry 26% recycling rate as anything but disgraceful. Obviously you, and a small portion of other residents are responsible people, take the time to sort their waste but the councils own recycling rate stats cannot be ignored.

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • I am with you on most of that Lionel -crazy to be using farm land to grow biomass when we could be burning the less viable recyclables. The climate change faction obsession with CO2 levels is partly to blame. Fiona-yes at least in GY where householders have to pay around £40 a year with an initial fee of £10 ish for the brown bin. This is because it would be "unfair" to have a free service for those who have gardens because lots of GY town residents don't-never mind that those outside the town pay higher council tax and don't get it lavished on them like those in the town. I have no idea about the rest of the county but I reckon it will be a boom time for rat poison sales when people start composting and many will opt for a bonfire instead of a trek to the dump-sorry -recycling centre. Does anyone know where the figures are for the county's income from recycling sales? Or are we paying to have it carted away to sit in piles abroad?

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Some West Norfolk false assumptions going on here. GY was been recycling for years with green bin fortnightly collections-although the glass collection was abandoned some time back there are collection points in most villages for glass and clothes etc and the recycling station at Caister is very busy. Surprising that metal lids from glass jars cannot be recycled and a lack of clarity about tubes eg toothpaste , cosmetics etc so one assumes no. I do not think that NCC had failed to recognise any up and coming EU regulations and had instead been acting to comply with them until it had the ground pulled from under them-and now of course what we cant recycle is going to Suffolk-including that from the whingers in West Norfolk. The two elephants in the room which someone at the EDP should paint luminous are these-a total lack of initiative from government to change packaging laws so we are not paying for unwanted packaging and then paying to recycle it ( never mind the environmental impacts) . The other is transparency about the real rates of successful recycling,how much reduction in the use of petrocarbons raw materials and energy results, how much just goes to landfill somewhere else in the world and whether the end products are worth having or whether we would be better off obtaining energy from some of the products in refuse burning power stations. I also wonder why all organic domestic and garden waste is not being collected for bioenergy-whether methane production or biomass burners. But EDP we do need to know that our recycling is genuinely being bought to be recycled .

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • D.ROSS this is you...Please note: placing the wrong items in your recycling bin contaminates not only your bin, but also the whole vehicle load collected that day. Where evident contamination has occurred, our contractors will not collect your recycling bin and you will be asked to remove the contaminating items before your next collection. Once collected, all recyclables will go to a sorting facility in Costessey to be separated and then recycled

    Report this comment

    Piranha24

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • canary boy you need to get facts correct, we have been recycling in great yarmouth for at least 10yrs now. we have a black bin and a green bin.

    Report this comment

    calmudownboy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • This is a massive, and greatly delayed, move in the right direction. As everone involved in the incinerator battle knows the UK have no choice but to recycle everthing that it is possible to reuse or recycle from 2020. From that point on the EU are outlawing the incineration of any resusable or recyclable item. NCC never would acknowledge this ruling, it is to preserve the raw materials the planet cannot keep replacing, preferring to pretend that municiple residual waste would continue to increase while knowing all along that the reality is they would never be able to fullfil the 170,000 tonnes of waste they had contracted to send to Willows without replacing it with industrial and commercial waste attracting top up fees resulting in council tax payers funding the disposal of commercial and industrial waste which they have never been, and should never be, responsible for the disposal of. Poor old Gt Yarmouth residents are in for such a shock after not bothering to seperate any waste for so many years. Those of us in the West are very happy to now be able to put virtually all our waste into either the recycling bin, food waste bin or garden waste bin. The irony is that we all received large black bins last year when in reality most people will have hardly anything to put into them!

    Report this comment

    Canary Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • This provides yet another reason - were it needed - why the waste incinerator project made no sense.

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    Nemesis

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • It is a very good that we can now recycle more, but also believe that we should still take glass to the bottle banks, as the villages receive money for this.

    Report this comment

    beckhithe

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Excellent advance and about time. So many of things have been recyclable for years and it is only the laziness of the councils that has prevented us being able to recycle them. But we do need to sort out these lid question. The instructions are as clear as mud.

    Report this comment

    alecto

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • "Fiona-jane Barrett" yes we do.

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    calmudownboy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • So, can lids be recycled or not?

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • We need clarification on this lids on glass jars as it will make a hell of a difference to recycling rates and is clearly already causing confusion. Lionel, I seem to remember from when I was at school in the early seventies that the population of the UK was somewhere around 55 million.

    Report this comment

    Mr. Raspberry

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • EDP have cut and pasted this incorrectly - glass bottles and jars can (of course) be recycled without lids. Plastic bottles can also be recycled with lids.

    Report this comment

    Red

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • Whats so difficult in using the bins, if you follow the instructions it is easy, and if you wash empty jars the bins stay fairly clean, simple reallly

    Report this comment

    Derek McDonald

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • When will they clean the bins like they used back in the good old days?

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • is it true In Norfolk u have to pay to recycle garden waste

    Report this comment

    Fiona-jane Barrett

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • does this apply to great yarmouth?

    Report this comment

    calmudownboy

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • The one thing this report does not tell people is where does our Rubbish go. Does it go to a place to be sorted or does it go to landfill. If it goes to a place to be sorted all the class that gets broken in the dustcart and it gets loaded and during transit it all seems rather dangerous. If mixed in with many other items to be sorted by hand or is it all now done by mechanical means. It will be nice to be told what has changed so much where are rubbish is taken to,... so that we can now put glass in with our recycling... What does the majority of it go to landfill.. In 1970 there were approximately 35 million people living in the UK it is now risen to 65 million The amount of rubbish per day is astronomical including businesses, I am surprised today there anything that goes to landfill cannot be used as fuel to power electricity stations like they do in some parts of Europe. With technology today keeping emissions down to a low level. May be even more productive than windfarms at far lower cost..... As we import 25% of our electricity at a price determined in Europe it makes sense to try and produce more if not all of our own electricity and self sufficient. If the population increases from 65 to 70 million by 2525. That is a lot of extra people Who will require electricity, this is extra to the increasing demand from the rest of us. Relying on Other countries for some of our electricity is a danger in the future.. If they cut us off we all know what power cuts are like and how they affect us all. No power means no lights no heat and no charging of mobile phones or TV. So use all of our surplus rubbish to produce more of our own power needs.... This seems basic logic...

    Report this comment

    Lionel

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • That first sentence should say: So lids from glass jars are not recyclable, but lids from glass jars are recyclable if we leave the lid on?

    Report this comment

    Ojustaboo

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • I have got fed up with this, I don't know where I am; I'll just lump the lot in and let them sort it.

    Report this comment

    D. ROSS

    Monday, September 29, 2014

  • So lids from glass jars are not recyclable, but glass jars are only recyclable if we leave the lid on? What happens if I chuck in a jam jar complete with lid and it breaks in the bin, now the lid is all on its own. And plastic bottle lids are recyclable if left on the bottles, meaning the air can't escape hence the bottle won't compress so takes up more space. A household with a load of these every two weeks will find half their bin taken up with air.

    Report this comment

    Ojustaboo

    Monday, September 29, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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