Search

Diss company wins contracts to find unexploded bombs in USA and Taiwan

PUBLISHED: 14:57 12 March 2018 | UPDATED: 10:49 13 March 2018

Lee Gooderham, director of Ordtek, a specialist in finding unexploded bombs and mines on the seabed. Picture: TMS Media

Lee Gooderham, director of Ordtek, a specialist in finding unexploded bombs and mines on the seabed. Picture: TMS Media

Archant

Bomb detection specialists from Norfolk have won major contracts with offshore wind farm projects in the US and Taiwan.

Diss-based Ordtek, which finds unexploded mines and bombs on the seabed, has secured the deals with energy giant Ørsted, formerly Dong, after completing work with the company on two UK projects.

It worked with Ørsted on the Walney Extension and Hornsea Project One, both set to be the world’s largest offshore wind farms upon completion, and set a record for the number of unexploded ordnance (UXO) finds on an offshore wind farm when it found more than 40 items on the latter project.

The contract wins will be seen as further evidence of how supply chain companies in the East’s burgeoning renewables industry can gain experience and deploy their expertise globally.

Ordtek will work on the Bay State Wind and Ocean Wind Offshore wind farms off the US east coast, and will carry out risk assessments for contamination before construction begins on the Formosa 1 and Greater Changhua projects in Taiwan.

Director Lee Gooderham said: “Breaking into the US and Taiwan offshore wind markets, which is very new, is exciting news and has come at just the right time for us. A presence in the US and Taiwan will hopefully open more doors as the industry takes off in both countries.”

The Owen Road-based company launched an interactive online tool called MineMap for UK waters in 2016, which shares data about waters which were mined by the British and German forces during the wars, and the presence of other bombs and mines from training exercises and munitions dumping.

MineMap has now been extended to Danish, Belgian and Dutch waters, and has been used in the Borssele wind farm off the Netherlands.

Ordtek, which employs 13 people, is also producing best practice guidelines for UXO and boulder detection with consultants Cathie Associates, after being commissioned by the Offshore Wind Accelerator Project (OWA).

The OWA is a partnership between the Carbon Trust and nine offshore wind developers, and Mr Gooderham said the work assess new and existing technologies to make sure detection work was done to best-practice standards.

Other news

Yesterday, 17:44

Police have closed an armed robbery case after failing to identify a suspect.

Yesterday, 17:04

A Norfolk chip shop is set give a day’s takings to a charity that helps vulnerable military veterans to re-integrate back into society.

Yesterday, 13:55

Market Hill in Diss town centre has been closed for essential electrical repairs by UK Power Networks.

Yesterday, 08:50

The plight of a man living on the streets of Long Stratton has so moved a primary school pupil that he used his pocket money to help him.

Most Read

Thursday, January 26, 2017

The hunt is on today for a prolific gang that is stealing aircraft engines from hobby pilots across the region.

Read more
United Kingdom
Yesterday, 17:04

A Norfolk chip shop is set give a day’s takings to a charity that helps vulnerable military veterans to re-integrate back into society.

Read more
United Kingdom
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

A popular fish and chip shop that served 300 free portions of sausage and chips to Halloween trick-or-treaters is to again give free fish and chips on Christmas Day to those in need.

Read more
Friday, June 23, 2017

How handy it would be, in times of austerity, to rely on a visit from a Fairy Godmother who could appear at precisely the moment she was needed to wave her magic wand and make everything better.

Read more
Instagram

Local Weather

Overcast

Overcast

max temp: 10°C

min temp: 7°C

Show Job Lists

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Diss Mercury e-edition today
E-edition

Newsletter Sign Up

Diss Mercury weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy