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Lockdown inspires school children to design new products for local businesses

PUBLISHED: 16:26 13 October 2020 | UPDATED: 16:26 13 October 2020

Children at Aslacton Primary and Manor Field Infant and Nursery develop new products for local businesses. Picture: Corvus Education Trus

Children at Aslacton Primary and Manor Field Infant and Nursery develop new products for local businesses. Picture: Corvus Education Trus

Archant

Young children at two Norfolk schools have been working with businesses to support their local economy after lockdown.

Children at Aslacton Primary and Manor Field Infant and Nursery develop new products for local businesses. Picture: Corvus Education TrusChildren at Aslacton Primary and Manor Field Infant and Nursery develop new products for local businesses. Picture: Corvus Education Trus

After listening to prerecorded stories on how life changed during lockdown, children at Aslacton Primary and Manor Field Infant and Nursery develop new products for local businesses, some of which have been turned into real products.

Children at Aslacton Primary and Manor Field Infant and Nursery develop new products for local businesses. Picture: Corvus Education TrusChildren at Aslacton Primary and Manor Field Infant and Nursery develop new products for local businesses. Picture: Corvus Education Trus

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The children worked with Orchard Toys, Saffron Housing, Sugar Beat Eating House, The Old Ram Coaching Inn and James D Party Time.

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The ideas led to The Bird in Hand at Wreningham producing a new burger, James D Sweet Treats selling the winning waffle, The Butcher’s House making their winning stuffing, and Cafe Savannah updating their menu with the winning design.

The project also formed a trail of art and design work across Long Stratton and its neighbouring villages.

Organiser and class teacher Louise Mundford said: “Each one of us can make such a big difference to our local economy and it is great for our pupils to not only see that but to feel very involved; providing real purpose for their learning.”


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