Brave Ashley says thanks for cancer care

Twelve months ago, Ashley Kerridge could barely raise his left arm after a cancerous growth under his collarbone affected his movement.But the brave 20-year-old is now preparing to take on a 12-hour sponsored sporting challenge after being diagnosed with cancer for the second time in less than a year.

Twelve months ago, Ashley Kerridge could barely raise his left arm after a cancerous growth under his collarbone affected his movement.

But the brave 20-year-old is now preparing to take on a 12-hour sponsored sporting challenge after being diagnosed with cancer for the second time in less than a year.

The electrician from Roydon hopes to raise hundreds of pounds for a chemotherapy day unit, just weeks before he receives a bone marrow transplant.

Mr Kerridge was first diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma last May and had been in remission when he received the devastating news in January that the cancer had returned to his lymph nodes.


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The cancer patient is now hoping to give something back to Ipswich Hospital by raising money for the Woolverstone Wish Fund to help extend the hospital's chemotherapy ward.

The dedicated pool player is set to pot balls for 12 hours on Sunday, April 18 with his friend and captain of the Dickleburgh Demons pool team, Jason Bartrum, at the Diss Cue Club.

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Mr Kerridge, who has been enduring a punishing chemotherapy regime, said he wanted to do the fundraising event before a planned bone marrow transplant at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge

The former Stradbroke High School pupil, who got engaged to his partner Tracey Mobbs on Christmas Day, said he hoped the transplant will complete his recovery.

'I have always wanted to do something for them (Ipswich Hospital). Every time I go it is over �1,000 a time for the drugs they use on me and they do not get that money refunded. It is a little way of saying thanks for what they have done for me. They have been great,' he said.

Mr Kerridge, who has been unable to work for the last year, said he thought he had pulled a muscle when a lump formed on his neck in January, which signalled the return of his cancer.

'It was very hard to take and for ages I did not accept it. The chemo is horrible. Your head is constantly spinning. Your stomach feels like a washing machine and you have no energy and everything makes you sick.'

'It has been very tough to go from someone who is working and enjoying their job to stopping work and being financially unstable,' he said.

To sponsor Mr Kerridge, visit www.justgiving.com/Ashley-kerridge0

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