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Council join forces to oppose homes sale plans

PUBLISHED: 09:36 25 March 2010 | UPDATED: 11:29 12 July 2010

Two councils have joined forces to oppose changes to the way new homes on an affordable housing estate are sold.

Work on a 114 home scheme on the boundary of Diss and Roydon was set to start last month after being approved by district councillors two years ago.

Two councils have joined forces to oppose changes to the way new homes on an affordable housing estate are sold.

Work on a 114 home scheme on the boundary of Diss and Roydon was set to start last month after being approved by district councillors two years ago.

But fears have been raised that local families may lose out after the owner of the Long Meadow development, off Denmark Lane, submitted an application to vary a legal agreement.

Linford C-zero, which received £3m from the government to make the scheme eco-friendly, want to alter its S106 agreement to change the affordable flats and houses from leasehold to freehold.

Members of Diss Town Council and Roydon Parish Council have now submitted a joint response to South Norfolk Council expressing their concerns about the proposals.

Members are concerned about who would police the freehold of the 87 low-cost houses on Long Meadow, which are intended for local people. They fear that the properties could be snapped up by commuters and as buy-to-lets.

David Hall, vice-chairman of Roydon Parish Council, said: “We are very concerned about what is going on there. It does appear that the developers are not satisfied with what they have got. Who is to say there will not be more changes so these houses are no longer affordable.”

Simon Olander, of Diss Town Council, added: “It should be available for more local people and the local community will miss out the way it is going.”

The properties on the Long Meadow estate are currently being advertised from £66,000 for a one-bed apartment to £109,000 for a three-bed house.

A spokesman for Linford C-zero said new residents would have to pay more in the short-term for a freehold home, but would work out more affordable in the long-term by not having to pay a ground rent. She added that the changes had been recommended after canvassing potential buyers' opinions.


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