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Dyslexic teacher calls for positive attitude to condition

PUBLISHED: 08:01 24 February 2020 | UPDATED: 10:45 24 February 2020

 Zoe Brown is a dyslexia specialist, she is running a series of workshops to educate parents on what dyslexic is and understanding how to better teach and benefit their child. Pictures: ELLA WILKINSON

Zoe Brown is a dyslexia specialist, she is running a series of workshops to educate parents on what dyslexic is and understanding how to better teach and benefit their child. Pictures: ELLA WILKINSON

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A teacher who has worked with students with learning disorders for 10 years is passing her lessons to parents after living with dyslexia herself.

 Zoe Brown is a dyslexia specialist, she is running a series of workshops to educate parents on what dyslexic is and understanding how to better teach and benefit their child. Pictures: ELLA WILKINSON
Zoe Brown is a dyslexia specialist, she is running a series of workshops to educate parents on what dyslexic is and understanding how to better teach and benefit their child. Pictures: ELLA WILKINSON

Zöe Brown, 38, a teacher at Mancroft Learning, in Harleston, wants to change the stigma around dyslexia often held by parents.

The mother-of-three said: "I think there's little socially understood about dyslexia despite it being known about for 100 years.

"It's actually a good thing to be dyslexic. It is totally different from intelligence so the mind is very logical and lateral thinking and dyslexic people are incredible problem solvers."

Mrs Brown, from Denton, near Harleston, is holding a series of workshops in Norwich discussing what dyslexia, and other learning difficulties, are and what strengths they can bring to a child's education.

Zoe Brown is a dyslexia specialist, she is running a series of workshops to educate parents on what dyslexic is and understanding how to better teach and benefit their child. Pictures: ELLA WILKINSONZoe Brown is a dyslexia specialist, she is running a series of workshops to educate parents on what dyslexic is and understanding how to better teach and benefit their child. Pictures: ELLA WILKINSON

"What prompted me to do these workshops was a parent who told me that their child couldn't be dyslexic because he was clever," Mrs Brown added.

"It really surprised me that attitude prevailed. If a parent is thinking that, then their child is thinking that. I want parents to understand what dyslexia is and how complex learning can be."

Mrs Brown found teaching rewarding after living with dyslexia.

She started teaching children with social and behaviour difficulties who had been expelled from school, often teaching teenagers to read for the first time.

She said: "Through education I struggled with reading and writing, my spelling was awful but the trouble was the English language doesn't make sense and is fraught with many irregularities.

"I found it challenging and frustrating because I would get red marks all over my work and told I was wrong but I thought in my mind it was right.

"Because the dyslexic mind needs things to be relevant to learn, in physics and maths, I found it hard because I didn't see the point in learning things like angles.

"Whereas if I was being taught to build a shed I would understand the relevances of it practically."

The course takes place on Saturday, March 14 and 28 at Bookbugs and Dragon Tales bookshop in Timberhill.

For more information go to www.mancroftlearning
dyslexiacourse.co.uk

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