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Harleston gnomes break new ground

PUBLISHED: 12:36 26 August 2010 | UPDATED: 09:20 16 September 2010

Dozens of mischievous gnomes are springing up around a south Norfolk market town as part of a project to promote the joy of allotments and home-grown vegetables.

DOZENS of mischievous gnomes are springing up around a south Norfolk market town as part of a project to promote the joy of allotments and home-grown vegetables.

More than 40 children and adults got their hands dirty on Tuesday to create clay garden gnomes for the Harleston Breaking Ground initiative.

The arts scheme, which has been devised by the town's allotments association, has been organised to coincide with the Harleston and Waveney Festival.

A garden gnome sculpture workshop in Harleston Library is part of a series of events, which includes an open art and craft exhibition, which runs until September 1 at the Swan Hotel, and a visual celebration of Harleston's allotments in the Harleston Gallery, which begins today.

Kate Chenneour, of the Harleston Allotments Association, said the Breaking Ground activities had so far involved about 130 children. She added that the group hoped to continue the arts project in future years.

“We are trying to promote the fun bits about allotments; and garden gnomes are part of that. We are proud of our allotments and we hope to make people think about growing more things.”

“The open exhibition has involved all ages, stages and abilities and we have tried to make it as diverse as possible,” she said.

Sally Blows, community librarian, said Harleston Library was also supporting the project by growing its own vegetables outside.

An allotment themed exhibition at Harleston Gallery, in Old Market Street, featuring works from professionals and local schoolchildren, will run until September 25.

For more information, visit www.harlestonandwaveneyfestival.co.uk.


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