Fundraising tournament to help set up charity in memory of Charlie, 8

Charlie Goodwin, from Harleston, died at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge in 2019. Picture: Goodw

Charlie Goodwin, from Harleston, died at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge in 2019. Picture: Goodwin family - Credit: Archant

A charity tournament in memory of a football-mad eight-year-old will take place next month.

Charlie Goodwin died at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge in 2019, just hours after finally having a mystery condition diagnosed.

The youngster had battled bowel malrotation, which manifests during the embryonic stage of life, and now his family are set to host an afternoon of football in his honour at the Maltings Pavillion, in Bungay.

It comes as part of efforts to set up a charity in his honour to raise awareness of the condition.

His mother Nicky Goodwin said: "There is no charity in this country for this, or any awareness.

"We're trying to set up some events throughout the year to raise money to start our own charity.

"It's the first time we've been able to do it since he passed away because of the Covid lockdowns.

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"It is a rare condition and it meant he was in and out of hospital with no one picking it up."

Taking place from 12.30pm on Sunday, May 1, Charlie's Football Special will see football tournaments held, as well as food and drink, stalls, games and raffles, all to raise money for Charlie's Intestinal Malrotation Awareness.

Mrs Goodwin said: "He was the cheekiest little man, so intelligent, and knew everything about football.

"He was a Wolves fan like his dad and his favourite players were Raúl Jiménez, Diogo Jota and Rúben Neves.

"I hadn't heard of Jiménez before we signed him and suddenly Charlie was telling me everything about him.

"He wanted to be a referee so had his own cards, and he'd show us the red card if anyone wound him up."

The youngster's health had begun to decline in mid-July 2019, with the youngster experiencing severe abdominal pain, loss of appetite, vomiting and incontinence.

Despite carrying out a number of tests and scans in the ensuing weeks, doctors could not categorically pin down the reason for his illness.

He was admitted to hospital before being discharged, with his parents told he was a "medical mystery".

Charlie died in September 2019 as a result of haemorrhagic shock and multiple organ failure, with an inquest later finding his life could have been saved if not for a registrar's "unacceptable" assessment.

Anyone looking to have a stall at the event can contact organisers on Facebook @Charliesawareness.