Historic Norfolk village footpath is reopened - for the price of a pint of Adnams

David Moore on the footpath which has been opend afterbeing purchased by the parish councill in Tasb

David Moore on the footpath which has been opend afterbeing purchased by the parish councill in Tasburgh. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2013

An ancient footpath which connects two parts of a South Norfolk village has been reopened after the parish council bought the land - for the price of a pint of Adnams.

David Moore on the footpath which has been opend afterbeing purchased by the parish councill in Tasb

David Moore on the footpath which has been opend afterbeing purchased by the parish councill in Tasburgh. - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2013

The new Horseshoe Way path links Lower Tasburgh - the older part of the village - and Upper Tasburgh, where the more modern housing is situated.

The route - named after the old Horseshoes pub, which closed many years ago - disappeared along with a number of other footpaths in the village over the years.

Keen to reopen as many old walkways as possible, Tasburgh Parish Council made recreational footpaths a regular item on its meeting agendas to investigate which ones it could bring back into public use.

That led to the council negotiating to buy the strip of land off Low Road, including fencing, from owner Peter Read.


You may also want to watch:


'The price decided by Mr Read was the equivalent of a price of Adnams, £2.80, which the council was pleased to agree to,' a parish council spokesman said.

'We are hoping that residents will enjoy this new route from Lower to Upper Tasburgh.'

Most Read

The entrance to the path is opposite the old Horseshoes pub.

Dave Moore, parish council chairman, added: 'It's quite an active subject at the moment, as we're trying to get and keep as many of these footpaths open as possible.'

The council has also negotiated for grants to help pay for a kissing gate in the Heritage Field. The grant will include safety fencing for next to the pond by the field.

The path was previously overgrown, so parish councillors agreed to make it safe and accessible and to look into regular maintenance, possibly by walking the route themselves to tidy it and assess what upkeep is needed.

Lower Tasburgh, which more rural than the upper part, has many original houses remaining from the early 19th century.

Housing in Upper Tasburgh was built during the 1960s.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus