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Lorry driver dad makes vital delivery!

PUBLISHED: 10:15 23 July 2009 | UPDATED: 11:09 12 July 2010

Lorry driver Mark Garnham made the quickest delivery of his life when his wife Mandy announced that their second child was in a rush to enter the world.

Lorry driver Mark Garnham made the quickest delivery of his life when his wife Mandy announced that their second child was in a rush to enter the world.

The 35-year-old spoke of his shock after becoming an emergency midwife to deliver baby Alfie in the couple's bathroom at their home in Diss.

Mrs Garnham, 39, woke up in the early hours of July 10 with severe stomach pains. Fifteen minutes later, her second child arrived weighing 7lbs and 11ozs.

Baby Alfie is now making good progress at the family home in Tennyson Road, Diss, after spending the first five days of his life at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.

Mr Garnham, who has been a driver for Bartrum's haulage based at Eye for the last two years, said he had never been so scared when his wife went into labour at about 4.45am.

“When we got up, Mandy was in a lot of pain and I went downstairs to make a cup of tea and she started screaming for help. I went to the bathroom and I could see the baby's head.”

“It was the biggest shock I have had in my life and for once a Bartrum's lorry driver delivered something early! I have never been so scared in all my life. I take my hat off to the people that do it every day,” he said.

Mr Garnham followed the directions of a 999 operator to deliver the baby at 5.05am and was taken to hospital when paramedics arrived.

Mrs Garnham, whose first child Charly, 14 months, was born after four-hour labour, said she was “surprised” and “very lucky” that Alfie arrived so quickly. The couple also revealed that they had no plans of adding to their family in the future following the dramatic delivery.


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