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New initiative to combat speeding drivers in north Suffolk village

PUBLISHED: 10:50 03 July 2012

Members of the Redgrave Community Speed Watch look out for speeding motorists

Members of the Redgrave Community Speed Watch look out for speeding motorists

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A new scheme to combat speeding motorists potentially endangering the lives of young children in a north Suffolk village was launched on Monday.

Twelve volunteers donning fluorescent jackets are taking part in the Redgrave Community Speed Watch Scheme, following reports of problems with speeding drivers in The Street and Church Way.

The initiative has been backed by Suffolk police and received funding from Redgrave Parish Council to pay for a speed detection device and signs to be operated and put up by the volunteers.

Motorists caught exceeding the speed limit are then reported by the volunteers to the police, who will then send the driver a warning letter asking them to slow down in future.

However, if the speeding continues the police could then issue more warning letters with possible legal action in the future against the driver.

The aim of the scheme is to enable the volunteers to work in partnership with the police in rural areas by passing on information on drivers caught speeding.

Sgt Jon Eaves, of Suffolk police, said similar schemes had already been successful in Norfolk, adding: “From a deterrent and a research point of view it really is invaluable and it gives the community a sense of being involved and perhaps taking ownership in a small way.”

Volunteer Jackie Moss said she was surprised by the results of a traffic survey conducted in October 2011, which showed 11,800 vehicles passed through the village over a seven day period.

She said villagers were worried about speeding vehicles early in the morning when children were being picked up to go to school and therefore the volunteers, who have to be over 18, were likely to target their patrols for this time.

She added: “I think it is a national problem and a lot of the time people do not even realise they are speeding.”

The volunteers all undergo police vetting checks and are trained to use the speed detection device. They go out in pairs to monitor traffic in their own time.


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