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‘They’re my feathered babies’ - Woman faces eviction due to her four noisy parrots

PUBLISHED: 13:02 01 February 2019 | UPDATED: 13:20 01 February 2019

Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots.
Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019

Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

Archant 2019

Four parrots are causing a squawk in a south Norfolk housing estate after their owner was told to get rid of them - or face eviction.

Sue Baggott has been told to re-home her beloved parrots after landlords Flagship Homes received complaints about the noise they were making.

However, the 56-year-old has urged them to reconsider, describing the birds as her ‘feathered babies’.

But Flagship is standing by its decision, saying they are not allowed under the terms of her tenancy agreement.

Mrs Baggott said: “I was in floods of tears. They said to me you have to rehome every single bird. They’re my feathered babies. The parrots are my life. I suffer from really bad depression and they helped me through. I don’t know what the problem is, they aren’t constantly noisy.”

Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots.
Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

Mrs Baggott was moved into Bartrem Mews in Diss two years ago, following a mental breakdown caused by her battle with salivary gland cancer, during which she was forced to give up two dogs to meet tenancy requirements.

The 56-year-old founded Paradise 4 Parrots, a non-profit organisation for rehoming the birds, last year. She said a housing officer had originally told her that caged animals were allowed.

But in November 2018 Mrs Baggott and wife Claire received a phone call from Flagship Homes following a noise complaint about the parrots, three permanent pets and one temporary rescue.

After hearing nothing for several months, they were visited on Tuesday, January 29 by two Flagship representatives.

Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots.
Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

She said: “She said we had about four weeks to rehome the birds and they will be back to see if we have. She doesn’t realise these guys bond for life. How do they expect you to give up a beloved pet? My community of parrot lovers are up in arms about this.”

Mrs Baggott moved to Norfolk from Manchester three years ago to help out with her autistic grandchildren. She was evicted from her previous home due to a noise complaint made when she experienced a breakdown. Friends are raising money to buy Mrs Baggott a static caravan.

Lynne Riddoch at Flagship said: “We understand that this is a distressing situation for Mrs Baggott but under the terms of her tenancy agreement she is required to have written permission to keep pets. We reserve the right to refuse this permission where we feel the property is not suitable and/or we are concerned that the pet may cause a nuisance to other residents.

“We have asked Mrs Baggott to re-home the parrots, and told her we will re-visit towards the end of February to try and reach a resolution.”

Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots.
Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

All of Sue Baggott’s parrots, three of which are permenant pets, are rescues with pasts of abusive treatment.

Lola was found neglected and starving in Swindon. She was hosed down for moving too much and had a bird form of chlamydia, now treated. Mrs Baggott said when she was first rescued she hated humans but is now a loving pet.

Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots.
Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2019Sue and Claire Baggott face eviction from their diss home if they don't rehome their parrots. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2019

Spike was one of Mrs Baggott’s first rescues. The Blue Fronted Amazon is 35 years old. She said he is too old to be “passed around” now.

George was an emergency rescue, after it was found he was kept in a small travel-sized cage, and left alone for 12 hours every day without toys or distractions.

Mrs Baggott said: “He came from a very stressful home. He was completely bald when he came in.”

Fred was found in an outdoor enclosure in mid-winter, sharing with an aggressive female. The female is now with an owl sanctuary.

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