Pensioner leaves �300,000 to charity

A pensioner who died earlier this year has left his entire estate - worth almost �300,000 - to a Norfolk charity for disabled people.Harry Leslie Last, 80, who worked in the kitchens at Wymondham College before living in the Ogden Close sheltered housing scheme, left the money to the Norfolk and Norwich Scope Association (Nansa) when he died in May.

A pensioner who died earlier this year has left his entire estate - worth almost �300,000 - to a Norfolk charity for disabled people.

Harry Leslie Last, 80, who worked in the kitchens at Wymondham College before living in the Ogden Close sheltered housing scheme, left the money to the Norfolk and Norwich Scope Association (Nansa) when he died in May.

The charity is planning to use the money to refurbish its adult and family centres, building a transition suite to give people the chance to learn about household management.

It will also give adults with learning or physical disabilities the opportunity to develop their skills through educational, vocational and personal development programmes.


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Mr Last, of Tibenham, who did not have any children, had been donating money to Nansa since the 1970s, and his friend, David Gooderham, said that the benefactor led a quiet and simple life.

His house was sold when he moved into sheltered housing, which is where the money left in which will came from.

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He said: 'He didn't have any link to Nansa that I knew of, but I think he was wondering what he could do with his money. We used to have fundraising events and barn dances for Scope in the 1970s, and he would always come along to the functions and put in a donation, but never stay. He was a very private individual.

'He was a popular character at Ogden Close and people were always asking after him. I think he made quite a few friends there.

'I didn't know him very well, but 10 years ago he asked me if I would be the executor of his will and look after his affairs, and I said I would.'

The money will also be spent on improving the facilities at Nansa Family Centre, in Woodcock Road, Norwich, which offers pre-school skills development programmes and training and support for children with physical and learning disabilities, and their families and carers.

Jessica Rice, fundraising officer for Nansa, said: 'Every penny has already been allocated and this will make a lot of difference. Our adult centre has been around since the 1970s and is desperate for refurbishment. We are having a new car park, new windows and more specialist equipment in there.

'We have recently started a teenage project and so we will be spending some of the money on adapting an area for teenagers.

'But we will still be fundraising, because although this money will help us make massive improvements to the service we can provide, we still need the funds to run it on a day-to-day basis.'

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