Photo gallery: Children show creative writing skills as mystery egg appears at Harleston school

Children from Harleston Primary school investigate the appearance of a mysterious nest and egg durin

Children from Harleston Primary school investigate the appearance of a mysterious nest and egg during an everybody writes day. - Credit: Archant Norfolk

Pupils turned detective as they tried to find out uncover the truth behind why a mystery nest appeared overnight in the school field at Harleston Primary.

Children from Harleston Primary school investigate the appearance of a mysterious nest and egg durin

Children from Harleston Primary school investigate the appearance of a mysterious nest and egg during an everybody writes day. - Credit: Archant Norfolk

Children arrived at school last Thursday expecting a normal day in the classroom.

An adjectives map produced by the children at Harleston Primary School for the Everybody Writes Day.

An adjectives map produced by the children at Harleston Primary School for the Everybody Writes Day. - Credit: Archant

But an atmosphere of suspense and surprise soon took over as signs directed pupils to the nearby field, where CSI-dressed investigators were waiting and a fire engine later arrived.

Headteacher Roger Walsh then broke the shock news that a giant egg had been discovered on the school grounds - and that he was unsure even whether it was safe to handle.

Closer inspection showed the egg was indeed okay to examine - at which point teachers sent the pupils off to explore what the egg was, who it belonged to and how it had got there.


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Each class was given a different brief, with year-two writing a rap, years five and six filing news reports and year-four writing non-fiction pieces.

Judging by the write-ups seen by the Mercury, there seemed to be common consent that the egg belonged to some sort of reptile which had since escaped.

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But pupil Grace Molenaar, 11, summed it up perfectly when she wrote: 'I don't think anyone will ever know whether the creature with scaly skin, large feet and yellow blood is a gecko or even a lizard.

'But the thought of an extinct animal on your school grounds will be burned into the memory of these children forever.'

Literacy co-ordinator Sarah Armstrong said the events of last Thursday, which has been called Everybody Writes Day, had acted as an inspiration to get the whole school writing about something exciting and engaging.

'They had such great ideas - better than we imagined they would,' she said.

'They were all going round questioning the CSI investigators and were helping the investigators.

'There was a real buzz and each produced a piece of writing on what they imagined it to be. It wasn't like a lesson - it was a real life experience for them, including the writing. It was really impressive.'

The question of where the creature is, however - or whether it might return - remains a mystery.

What is going on at your child's school? Tell the Mercury by calling 01379 651153 or email dma.news@archant.co.uk

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