Search

See tanks crushing cars at Norfolk's Armourfest

PUBLISHED: 11:54 05 August 2019 | UPDATED: 11:54 05 August 2019

Armourfest at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex Layzell

Armourfest at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex Layzell

Archant

Tanks crushing cars, live action displays, and a national memorial is what is on offer as Armourfest returns to Norfolk.

Mark IV Tank, Deborah, as seen on Channel 4 with Guy Martin. Armourfest at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex LayzellMark IV Tank, Deborah, as seen on Channel 4 with Guy Martin. Armourfest at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex Layzell

This popular event, held at the Norfolk Tank Museum at Forncett St Peter, is back for another weekend where tank fanatics have been promised "non-stop military mayhem".

It will be held on August 10 to 11, with the gates opening at 9am.

There will be chances to see Centurion tanks, "live and smoking", crush a car using special manoeuvres.

There will also be other military vehicles, including Saladin armoured cars being put through its paces in the arena.

WW1 national memorial on tour around UK - Poppy of Honour at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex LayzellWW1 national memorial on tour around UK - Poppy of Honour at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex Layzell

Visitors will also be able to enjoy First World War re-enactors with Deborah, the museum's Mark IV tank, which was featured on channel four with petrol head and adrenaline junkie Guy Martin.

You may also want to watch:

Among all of the action, the museum will be home to a national memorial, the Poppy of Honour, which is making a special appearance until August 12.

Stephen Machaye, director of the museum, said: "It is a privilege to have The Poppy of Honour 2018 with us here in Norfolk."

Armourfest at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex LayzellArmourfest at Norfolk Tank Museum. Photo: Alex Layzell

The memorial, which has been touring the UK for the last year, is an 8ft tall poppy-shaped glass sculpture surrounded by steel silhouettes of four soldiers.

It contains the names and ranks of all 1,115,471 British and Commonwealth serviceman and woman who were lost in the First World War, all hand-written on individual poppies.

The sculpture was the idea of Terry Williams, from Somerset, who said: "This is the first national memorial holding the collective names of every person killed or missing in action in WW1. They are not forgotten. They are here."

The museum is also offering a unique experience by allowing people to bring their own military vehicles to test out on the assault course and the chance to climb inside a Cheiftain tank.

Tickets for the event cost £10 for adult, £5 for 12 to 16-year-olds and under-12s get in for free.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Diss Mercury

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists