Record numbers enjoy a mix of farming tradition and fun entertainment at the 2017 Wayland Show

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Glorious sunshine and the chance to learn about farming livestock, watch racing sheep and daring motorcyclists brought record numbers to one of the country's longest running agricultural shows this weekend.

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Aiming to entertain and educate, a mix of traditional country show pastimes and modern delights for all the family helped attract more visitors than ever to 144th Wayland show.

Highlights of this year's show ranged from a family fun dog show, a parade of vintage tractors, the fearless performances of the Imps motorcycle display team and a host of food and drink from Norfolk producers.

But for many it is the chance to see prize-winning livestock, traditional agricultural practices and the chance to get up close and personal with sheep, cattle, pigs, horses and poultry which brings visitors back year on year to the show.

Former dairy farmer Ava Malt who was at the show with her dairy cattle said: 'The show is a typical country fair, the general public love coming to see the livestock. I enjoy interacting with them and talking to them about the cattle.'

The horse and hounds from the West Norfolk Hunt at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

The horse and hounds from the West Norfolk Hunt at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017


You may also want to watch:


For Jack Burr, who was visiting the show for the first time with his family, there were many highlights to choose from.

The 10-year-old said: 'I liked looking at all the animals, the lamb national and the Imps motorcycle team.'

Most Read

While seven-year-old Tallulah Watkins said the whole day had been 'wonderful'.

But putting together an event which both entertains and educates the public is no easy task. For the show organisers and more than 100 volunteers who make the event happen, the day is the culmination of a lot of hard work and preparation.

The hounds from the West Norfolk Hunt thrill the children at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADL

The hounds from the West Norfolk Hunt thrill the children at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Fabian Eagle, the show chairman, said: 'We're entirely pleased with the day and the numbers seem to be up on last year.

'The whole idea behind the show is that every feature has a benefit, it has got to be a damn good day out and a nice mix. You can't pick out a highlight, the cattle are back, the Imps motorcycle team are fantastic, the home section, there is so much you can't pinpoint just one thing.

'We're constantly trying to re-invent things but always keeping its old core.'

Freddy Bethley, ten, left, with his cousin Amy Byford, 12, and his brother Harry, eight, ready to sh

Freddy Bethley, ten, left, with his cousin Amy Byford, 12, and his brother Harry, eight, ready to show Amy's Hampshire Downs at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Bob Hogg's geese and dog in his sheepdog display at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Bob Hogg's geese and dog in his sheepdog display at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Young handler Jessica McInnes, 12, right, and her sister, Ella, nine, prepare Weybread Myth for her

Young handler Jessica McInnes, 12, right, and her sister, Ella, nine, prepare Weybread Myth for her class at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Three-year-old Evie Lanham, from North Burlinghzm her four-month old calf Billy at the Wayland Show.

Three-year-old Evie Lanham, from North Burlinghzm her four-month old calf Billy at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Action from the Lamb National at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Action from the Lamb National at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Sisters annabelle Wortley, three, left, and Scarlett, five, with a knitted calf at the Wayland Show.

Sisters annabelle Wortley, three, left, and Scarlett, five, with a knitted calf at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

The donkey calls out during the East Anglia Donkey Breed Society display at the Wayland Show. Pictur

The donkey calls out during the East Anglia Donkey Breed Society display at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Novice riding event at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Novice riding event at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Classic tractors at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Classic tractors at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Action from the Imps Motorcycle Display team at the Wayland Show. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2017

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter