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Redgrave medic completes blindfolded marathon

PUBLISHED: 15:16 18 April 2011

Combat medical technicians James Chard and Paul Harrison and James Chard, serving in A Squadron of the Royal Army Medical Corps' 254 Medical Regiment based in Norwich.

Combat medical technicians James Chard and Paul Harrison and James Chard, serving in A Squadron of the Royal Army Medical Corps' 254 Medical Regiment based in Norwich.

© ARCHANT NORFOLK 2011

A COMBAT medic from Redgrave has spoken of his relief at completing his first marathon after being blinded for half of the run.

Diss First Responder Paul Harrison finished the Brighton Marathon on April 10, despite carrying a 40lb rucksack and running it blindfolded.

The 30-year-old, who serves in A Squadron of the Royal Army Medical Corps’ 254 Medical Regiment based in Norwich, ran the 26 mile course with colleague James Chard in just over seven hours.

The pair, who ran the marathon in their army boots in sweltering conditions, hope to boost the profile of St Dunstan’s, which provides lifelong care and support services for blind ex-service men and women, and have raised more than £5,000 for the charity.

Pte Harrison, who ran the first half of the marathon blindfolded, before swapping roles with Pte Chard, said it was a day to remember. Both men had to stop for medical treatment after their heavy rucksacks started to restrict the blood supply to their arms.

“It was absolutely amazing and the support we had was incredible. There was a heat wave on the day and our arms were swelling up with the weight.”

“It was the most random day out and we were asked if we wanted to go for a cup of tea with the mayor and mayoress of Brighton, which he accepted,” he said.

Pte Harrison, who spent the following day recovering in bed, said he hoped to do another blindfolded fundraising activity in the future.

For more information, visit www.blindfoldedmarathon.com


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