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Sepsis survivor raises thousands for hospital that saved her

PUBLISHED: 12:56 29 November 2018 | UPDATED: 13:19 29 November 2018

Lynne Ainge is pictured centre behind the cheque, with Carole Wall and members of the Sepsis project team at James Paget Hospital, including deputy director of nursing Jacky Copping.  PHOTO: James Paget Hospital

Lynne Ainge is pictured centre behind the cheque, with Carole Wall and members of the Sepsis project team at James Paget Hospital, including deputy director of nursing Jacky Copping. PHOTO: James Paget Hospital

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A sepsis survivor has raised £2,000 for the James Paget University Hospital to help continue work to raise awareness of the condition and to say thank you to staff.

Lynne Ainge is pictured centre behind the cheque, with Carole Wall and members of the Sepsis project team at James Paget Hospital, including deputy director of nursing Jacky Copping.  PHOTO: James Paget HospitalLynne Ainge is pictured centre behind the cheque, with Carole Wall and members of the Sepsis project team at James Paget Hospital, including deputy director of nursing Jacky Copping. PHOTO: James Paget Hospital

Lynne Ainge organised Swing for Sepsis, a Rat Pack themed night of music and dancing with Aaron Bolton, at the Best Western Brome Grange Hotel near Diss in September.

Around 60 people attended the evening and £2,000 was raised through ticket sales, a raffle and donations.

On Friday, January 13, 2017 Ms Ainge, who splits her time between Diss and Ireland, sustained a small but deep cut to her ankle from a piece of glass.

The injury was washed and covered but after a few days it became red and infected. Ms Ainge made a plan to go to her local GP but before the morning surgery the infection had spread to her knee.

A friend, Carole Wall, brought her straight to A and E where she received antibiotics, fluids and painkillers within 30 minutes.

She was admitted to Ward Four and underwent further tests as the infection continued to spread. With the Sepsis diagnosis Ms Ainge was monitored day and night until the infection cleared, spending three weeks in hospital.

Ms Ainge said; “I feel that I owe my life to the prompt care and attention of the team looking after me last year. It was a frightening time – I honestly didn’t think I’d make it.”

The retiree has been left with some ongoing damage to her kidney function, but this hasn’t stopped her continuing with her charity work.

There are around 250,000 cases of sepsis a year in the UK and the UK Sepsis Trust says more than 40,000 people die every year as a result of the condition. Sepsis occurs when our immune system overreacts to an infection or injury and, rather than fighting the infection, attacks the body’s own organs and tissue instead. If not treated quickly, sepsis can result in organ failure and death, but with early diagnosis it can be treated with antibiotics.

Identifying sepsis is not always easy as symptoms can look like other illnesses - to find out more visit the NHS website.

The James Paget Sepsis project team accepted the cheque from Ms Ainge and Carole Wall on Wednesday, November 28.

The money will go towards further education and training for staff, resources, and campaign material to aid Sepsis awareness.

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