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Bridget Riley exhibition coincides with major London show

PUBLISHED: 14:22 01 November 2019 | UPDATED: 14:22 01 November 2019

Bridget Riley in her London Studio in 1992. Picture: Ian McKinnell/Alamy

Bridget Riley in her London Studio in 1992. Picture: Ian McKinnell/Alamy

Credit: Ian McKinnell / Alamy Stock Photo

While Bridget Riley is the subject of a blockbuster London retrospective exhibition, a Norfolk gallery is also hosting a celebration of her work.

June, screenprint, 2002 by Bridget Riley part of a Diss exhibition. Picture: Diss Corn HallJune, screenprint, 2002 by Bridget Riley part of a Diss exhibition. Picture: Diss Corn Hall

The exhibition at Diss Corn Hall offers a survey of the groundbreaking artist's screenprints featuring the images that made her name in the 1960s.

It coincides with her major retrospective at the Hayward Gallery in London (which runs until January 26) which has attracted five-star reviews.

That exhibition is the largest retrospective of her work to date spanning the artist's entire career, from drawings she made as a schoolgirl in the 1940s to works completed this year.

Untitled Based On MovementSquares (1962) by Bridget Riley part of a Diss exhibition. Picture: Diss Corn HallUntitled Based On MovementSquares (1962) by Bridget Riley part of a Diss exhibition. Picture: Diss Corn Hall

Like the Hayward show, but in a more modest fashion, the Diss exhibition covers the various stages in Riley's career from her first exhibition to her more recent work - a span of six decades.

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Riley's name is synonymous with the Swinging Sixties, yet it was a chance encounter with gallery owner Victor Musgrave, who championed 'outsider art' and gave Riley her first exhibition at Gallery One in London in 1962, that propelled her to fame.

Riley After Rajasthan 2013 by Bridget Riley that is part of a Diss exhibition. Picture: Diss Corn HallRiley After Rajasthan 2013 by Bridget Riley that is part of a Diss exhibition. Picture: Diss Corn Hall

Her work was immediately identified with the 'Op Art' movement; abstract art that employed optical illusions. The unsettling visual impact of her work led to her becoming an international star in a few short years.

The free exhibition, which runs at the Corn Hall from November 18-29, ranges from her most identifiable black and white work from the 1960s, though her use of colour in the 70s to her more complex recent images.

Exhibition curator David Case said: "Riley only made a few black and white screen prints, which were early in her career and we are privileged in being able to show a selection of these, including her most famous image 'Movement in Squares', alongside the colour prints which reflect her evolving styles from later decades."

Mr Case will be giving a special free exhibition tour and talk on Saturday, November 23 (12pm-1pm) during which he will discuss Riley's career, focussing on her early monochrome work.

The exhibition is part of the Masters At The Corn Hall series which will continue in the New Year with a show featuring works by Lucian Freud, running from January 24-February 8.

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